Monthly Archives: August 2019

Sitecore analytics, cookie consent and personalization isn’t a great match – learn how to keep Sitecore functional without breaking the law!

Due to different laws (European as well as local legislation) companies have be very conversative in how they process data, while they have to take care on how they track people. People have to consent whether or not they will be tracked or not. Within Siecore, you might do both. This blogpost shares how to use your cookie consent strategy within Sitecore. In short: There are three level of cookies: Functional, analytic and tracking cookies. Without responding to the cookie consent, Only functional cookies are allowed, while analytics and tracking cookies is forbidden until a user gives approval for these kinds of functionality. Within Sitecore, this is hard to implement, due to the internal workings of Sitecore analytics and (from what I think) Sitecore bug. This blogpost explains why this is hard and how to solve this.

PS: Different companies classify the Sitecore cookies under different levels. I have seen classifications of “Functional”, “Analytics” and “Tracking”. I won’t judge any choice, as I am not a person with a legal background and can’t judge on what all companies implement to prevent data from being collected. This is my personal view and the approach should be applicable to every level. This blogpost applies to Sitecore 9.X Continue reading

Free op your local diskspace – easily get rid of your (old) logs

I bet that a lot of people have this issue: Having a lot of (old) Sitecore installations that you don’t want to remove, as you aren’t sure whether or not there is still some valuable configuration in it. With a default installation, these installations grow over time, as they are running by default and are (thus) generating logs. I never change the logging settings to just generate logs for one day, which means they will eat up a lot of diskspace, especially the xConnect ones, as they might generate logs up to 1Gb per logfile in size! The following powershell line can be used to delete all the logs which are older than 2 days: